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September 2020

At École James S. McCormick School, we put safety first. But safety doesn’t just mean physical safety. We believe students need to be and feel physically, emotionally, socially, and psychologically safe for in depth learning to occur. Learning is very difficult when students do not feel safe and secure. Students are treated by the staff with respect and dignity, and they are taught to treat each other in these ways as well. We also teach students how to treat themselves with respect and dignity, so they have confidence to learn and grow.

At École James S. McCormick School, we understand we have a mandate to prepare students for the future. In the midst of the current pandemic, we are experiencing, first-hand, how important it is to be able to adjust and flex according to global and/or local demands at any given time. As well, with technological changes, climate change, globalization, etc., it’s hard to know what skills will be needed in the future. According to a LinkedIn article called, 12 Jobs You’ll Be Recruiting for in 2030, “some 85% of the jobs that today’s students will be doing in 2030 haven’t been invented yet.” The article predicts there will be jobs such as internal organ and body part creators; self-driving car mechanics; and biofilm installers. Many of the students of our school will be graduating by 2030, and we need to prepare them for an ever-changing world with continually evolving demands. The staff of ÉJSMS has stepped up to the challenge.

At École James S. McCormick School, we teach the Alberta Education curriculum using a range of instructional strategies that includes learning outdoors, learning through the maker movement, and learning through the use of technology, including robotics and coding. In our classrooms you will find staff and students using hands-on and inquiry-based approaches to learning. The best we can do for our students, now, is ensure they have many opportunities to think creatively, learn to problem solve, collaborate with others, and struggle with challenges so they develop a growth mindset, an ‘I got this’ attitude, and stick-with-it-ness.